CAVIAR Bowl 1507, Silver

Georg 10019404 https://www.georgjensen.com/europe/caviar-bowl-1507-silver/10019404.html

The product has extended delivery time of 2-4 weeks.

€ 13.000,00
Complimentary gift wrapping Complimentary gift wrapping

The ultimate in luxurious gastronomy, caviar is a special treat that is a feast for the eyes as well as the palette, deserving the most devoted presentation. This exquisite sterling silver bowl with lid is entirely handmade by Georg Jensen’s supremely skilled silversmiths in Copenhagen and is inspired by original Art Nouveau designs. The bowl contains a handblown crystal glass dish, stood on a removable silver platform, allowing ice to be packed around the caviar to keep it at the correct temperature. The bowl itself shows the characteristic hammer marks giving the surface a magical ‘moonlit’ shimmer. It stands on a foot that is highly decorated with grapes and vines - motifs that also appear on the lid handle. Timeless style and astonishing craftsmanship combine to create something truly special.

Early Georg Jensen silverware was greatly influenced by the highly decorative Art Nouveau movement that swept through Europe at the turn of the 20th Century. Featuring generous curves, ornamental flourishes and an abundance of decorations inspired by the natural world, the pieces have a sophisticated elegance that has proved timeless.

The caviar bowl is expertly crafted from 925 Sterling silver with an inside dish of hand-blown crystal glass. Painstakingly made by hand, the bowl takes many hours of work to create before a final oxidised finish is given to highlight every tiny perfect detail.

Product details

Specifications

  • Item number: 10019404
  • Materials: Sterling Silver
  • Measurements: H: 150 mm / 5.91 inches. Ø: 220 mm. Full height(with lid): 150 MM Silver bowl height: 110 MM
  • Design year: 2021
  • Launch year: 2021
Meet the designer
Georg Jensen

In 1904 the Danish silversmith Georg Jensen founded his first modest silver smithy in the heart of Copenhagen. Thirty years later, he had made an international name for himself. When he died in 1935, the New York Herald Tribune saluted him as "the greatest silversmith of the last 300 years."